25 JAN 2015 by ideonexus

 Biotechnology will Free Us from the Tyranny of Normalcy

Christopher Dewdney: Most people's “ideals” would turn them into underachieving Nicole Kidmans and eight-foot Brad Pitts, identical cutouts. My previous, rather naïve, notion was that biotechnology would free us from the tyranny of “normalcy”—that we could become anything we wanted, morph ourselves into elongated, blue-skinned, orange-haired, sixteen-fingered geniuses, or perhaps flying ribbons of sensual bliss that performed acrobatic choreographies above the sunset.
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25 JAN 2015 by ideonexus

 NBIC: Nano-Bio-Info-Cogno

There's no one silver bullet technology that's going to make us all into superbeings. The trick is in the mix of different technologies. NBIC stands for nanotechnology, biotechnology, information technology, and cognitive science. Look at it this way: with nanotechnology and biotechnology, we stand to gain control over inorganic and organic matter. With advanced information technology, we get not just the horrendous data glut that's now tormenting us (and our National Security Agency), but d...
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25 JAN 2015 by ideonexus

 Mormonism as Transhumanism

Most Mormon Transhumanists consider our religion to be remarkably compatible with transhumanism. We consider Mormonism to be a religious transhumanism. Eternal progression is a central doctrine of Mormonism. Basically, the idea is that we have all existed in some form or another into the indefinite past; that we have been and are progressing toward becoming like God in a creative and benevolent capacity; and that we should each help others do the same into the indefinite future. Mormon script...
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25 JAN 2015 by ideonexus

 Enlightenment as the Birth of Progress

Only in the 18th century Enlightenment did the concept of progress become widespread. Earlier, most people thought of history in terms of a fall from a past Golden Age, or perhaps repeating cycles. (If they thought of such things at all. Mostly they just worried about their next meals.) With the Industrial Revolution, progress became almost synonymous with science and technology. By the late 19th and early 20th century, we see the beginnings of modern science fiction (Verne, Wells), and prot...
Folksonomies: enlightenment progress
Folksonomies: enlightenment progress
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24 JAN 2015 by ideonexus

 H.G. Wells on the Future

We look back through countless millions of years and see the great will to live struggling out of the intertidal slime, struggling from shape to shape and from power to power, crawling and then walking confidently upon the land, struggling generation after generation to master the air, creeping down into the darkness of the deep; we see it turn upon itself in rage and hunger and reshape itself anew, we watch it draw nearer and more akin to us, expanding, elaborating itself, pursuing its relen...
Folksonomies: futurism purpose
Folksonomies: futurism purpose
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24 JAN 2015 by ideonexus

 Warm-Blooded Plants: Zero-g, Zero-T, and Zero-P

There are three principal obstacles to be overcome in adapting a terrestrial species to life in space. It must learn to live and be happy in zero-g, zero-T, and zero-P, that is to say, zero-gravity, zero-temperature, and zero-pressure. Of these, zero-g is probably the easiest to cope with, although we are still ignorant of the nature of the physiological hazards which it imposes. To deal with zero-T is simple in principle although it may be complicated and awkward in practice. Fur and feather...
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24 JAN 2015 by ideonexus

 The Dilemma of Human Diversity Across the Cosmos

When life spreads out and diversifies in the universe, adapting itself to a spectrum of environments far wider than any one planet can encompass, the human species will one day find itself faced with the most momentous choice that we have had to make since the days when our ancestors came down from the trees in Africa and left their cousins the chimpanzees behind. We will have to choose, either to remain one species united by a common bodily shape as well as by a common history, or to let our...
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24 JAN 2015 by ideonexus

 Diversification in the Cosmos

The last of the five philosophical problems is the problem of final aims. The problem here is to try to formulate some {298} statement of the ultimate purpose of the universe. In other words, the problem is to read God's mind. Previous attempts to read God's mind have not been notably successful. One of the more penetrating of such attempts is recorded in the Book of Job. God's answer to Job out of the whirlwind was not encouraging. Nevertheless I stand in good company when I ask again the ...
Folksonomies: futurism vision
Folksonomies: futurism vision
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24 JAN 2015 by ideonexus

 H.G. Wells Time Machine and Evolution

Nobody has imagined the future of fate with greater artistry than H. G. Wells in his fantasy The Time Machine, published in 1895. Wells imagined the human species split in two, the spark of reason dulled and the sense of purpose extinguished. His two species, the degenerate descendants of the upper and lower classes of Victorian England, are caught in an evolutionary dead end without hope of escape. The lower class, living underground like rats, has retained enough manual dexterity to keep th...
Folksonomies: futurism
Folksonomies: futurism
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24 JAN 2015 by ideonexus

 Technology is Preserving Our Ghosts

Our technology is giving us progressively greater power to keep alive our ancestors' ghosts. First the invention of writing allowed us to preserve their words. Painting and photography allowed us to preserve their faces. The phonograph preserves their voices and the videotape recorder preserves their movement and gestures. But this is only the beginning. Soon we shall acquire the technology to preserve a permanent record of the sequence of bases in the DNA of their cells. This means that we s...
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